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2014/2015 EVENTS CALENDAR
| Archives | University Academic Calendar |
Last Updated October 14, 2014


Fall 2014
[September | October | November | December]

Spring 2015
[January | February | March | April]


FALL 2014
SEPTEMBER
September 15
Monday
12:35pm-3:35pm
Hickman Hall Room 119
DOUGLASS CAMPUS

CAS, the Department of Women's and Gender Studies, and the Department of French present a talk by French Visiting Professor Véronique Tadjo (journalist, painter, and award-winning author of numberous volumes of fiction, poetry, and children's literature) entitled, entitled, "Art and Activism? Lessons From Rwanda."

Reading: selections from her book The Shadow of Imana: Travels in the Heart of Rwanda (ps 3-17, 39-48, 102-118) available upon request to Renee DeLancey (rdelance@rutgers.edu).

Special thanks to Abena P. A. Busia, Chair, Department of Women's and Gender Studies, for hosting this talk in her Social Justice course 01:904:399:01.

September 17
Wednesday
4:30pm-6pm (Reception will follow lecture)
Alexander Library
4th Floor Teleconference Lecture Hall
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS
flyer

The Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages' Distinguished Lecture Series presents a lecture by Aamir Mufti (Comparative Literature, UCLA) entitled, "The Ghazal Among the Nations."
The sponsors include CAS, the School of Arts and Sciences Dean’s Office, the Program in Comparative Literature, the Program in South Asian Studies, and Middle Eastern Studies.

September 18
Thursday
9am-4:30pm
Cook Campus Center, 1st Floor Multipurpose Room
59 Biel Road
COOK CAMPUS
Register here
Agenda

Dr. Carl Pray (Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics)invites you to attend the symposium, "Genetically Modified Food Crops in Asia and Africa: Opportunities, Barriers and Constraints." Sponsored by the Templeton Foundation, this symposium will be the first day of a two day conference which will present the results of a multi-year, multi-institution research program that has examined how current policy making regarding GM agriculture in China, India, Kenya and Uganda is influenced by consumer, economic and environmental interest groups and the expected benefits or losses from the adoption of GM maize and rice. The goal of this research is to provide policy makers in these four countries, and beyond, with information and policy alternatives that could make safe and sustainable GM food and seed technology available to small farmers in developing countries.

The symposium will include invited presentations on agricultural biotechnology advances which could increase yields, reduce the impact of drought, and improve nutrition in developing countries. Confirmed speakers include Josette Lewis, Associate Director, World Food Center, University of California-Davis; Mark Edge, Water Efficient Maize for Africa, Monsanto; Marc Albertson Senior Research Fellow, DuPont-Pioneer; and Gary Toenniessen, member of the Humanitarian Board of the Golden Rice Project. The symposium will conclude with a panel discussion on the state of GM technology and policy in China, India, East Africa and Brazil with panelists Jikun Huang, Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy; Jose Maria da Silveira, University of Campinas, Brazil; Bharat Ramaswami, Indian Statistical Institute; and Hugo de Groote, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center, Nairobi.

September 23
Tuesday
12pm-1pm
Comparative Literature
195 College Avenue
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS

Comparative Literature's Brown Bag Lunch Series
is pleased to welcome Professor Ousseina Alidou (CAS Director and Professor, Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures/ Comparative Literature). Professor Alidou will begin her 20-minute presentation around 12:15. All students and faculty are welcome to attend -- and to bring their lunch, too.
September 24
Wednesday
8pm
Rutgers Student Center, Multipurpose Room
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS
flyer

The Writers at Rutgers Reading Series is pleased to present a reading by Chris Abani
(Nigerian novelist, poet, essayist, screenwriter and playwright).
September 26
Friday
11am-12pm
Rutgers Student Center, Multipurpose Room
126 College Avenue
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS
Parking: Visitors may park without a permit in Lots 26 and 30, and in the College Avenue Deck.

Made possible by the GAIA Centers and CAS, President Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete of the United Republic of Tanzania will deliver a public lecture on on Friday, September 26, 2014, at 11 a.m.-Noon at the College Ave Student Center in New Brunswick.

During his 60-minute lecture, Kikwete will discuss the role that partnerships between academia, business, and government agencies have in finding solutions to today's global challenges.

President Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete is the fourth and current president of the United Republic of Tanzania. Previously, Kikwete was the minister for finance in 1994; he served as minister for foreign affairs and international cooperation from 1995 until 2005--the year he was elected president. He was chairperson of the African Leaders Malaria Alliance (ALMA) for 2010-2011, the chairperson of the East African Community (EAC), the chairperson of the African Union (AU) in 2008, and co-chair of the Helsinki Process on Globalization and Democracy in 2004. President Kikwete graduated from the University of Dar es Salaam in 1975.

The winner of several international awards and honors, Kikwete was recognized by the United Nations Foundation during the Social Good Summit in 2011 for his commitment to social media and technology.

We hope you will join us for this once-in-a-lifetime event. To better accommodate our attendees, please take a moment to register for this free event.

OCTOBER
October 1
Wednesday
4:30pm-6pm
Brower Commons Rooms A, B, and C
145 College Avenue
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS
flyer

The
Department of English, the Department of Africana Studies, the Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures, the Program in Comparative Literature, the Department of French, CAS, and Undergraduate Academic Affairs present "A Reading and Conversation with Keorapetse Kgositsile (South Africa's Poet Laureate) and Véronique Tadjo (visual artist and award winning writer of numerous volumes of fiction, poetry, and children's literature; and Fall 2014 Visiting Scholar in the RU Department of French)." Please join us for a joint-reading with two world-renowned African writers. The authors, from South Africa and France/Côte d'Ivoire respectively, will follow their reading with a discussion of their writing in the context of contemporary developments in literature.

A conversation, Q&A, and reception will follow the authors’ readings.
October 6
Monday
11am-12:30pm
Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis
88 College Avenue
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS

The Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis presents a talk by Abena Dove Osseo-Osare (History, University of Texas, Austin) entitled, "From Plants to Pharmaceuticals: Take Bitter Roots for Malaria."

How do plants become pharmaceuticals? In this talk, Abena Dove Osseo-Asare examine the history of efforts to patent a treatment for malaria made from the bitter roots of fever vine (Cryptolepis sanguinolenta). Malaria is a serious health risk in tropical West Africa. In Ghana, where these bitter roots became known as “Ghana Quinine,” a group of African scientists devoted their lives to creating a patented pharmaceutical from the plant. She considers their interactions with traditional healers from the 1940s, their struggles to establish a fledgling pharmaceutical industry, and the conflicts that complicated the success of the new drug in this postcolonial nation. This little known historical case provides a window into recent controversies surrounding biodiversity prospecting in tropical environments, the rights of indigenous peoples to shared benefits, and the quest for pharmaceutical patents. It is drawn from her recently published book, Bitter Roots: The Search for Healing Plants in Africa.

Abena Dove Osseo-Asare is an historian of medicine and science who focuses on cases in African societies. Her first book, Bitter Roots: The Search for Healing Plants in Africa (University of Chicago Press, 2014) is a study of six plants which scientists in Ghana, South Africa, Madagascar and other countries sought to transform into new pharmaceuticals. Abena Dove received her PhD in the History of Science from Harvard University and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. She has received awards from the National Science Foundation, Fulbright Foundation, Ford Foundation, and Hellman Family. She is an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Texas, Austin.
October 6
Monday
12pm-130pm

Alexander Library, Pane Room
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS

Graduate students are cordially invited to attend the Graduate Student Lunch Series: Global Topics. On October 6 Dina N. Elshahawany, Visiting Research Student, Rutgers Graduate School-New Brunswick, Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, will present "The Urban Development Situation in Egypt in the Light of New Communities Experiment and Future Challenges."
Networking and lunch begins at 12:00 pm followed by the presentation and discussion.
A light lunch is provided.

As part of the series, graduate students from any discipline/campus meet to present papers that have a global or international focus. The Series is an opportunity for graduate students to share their work with colleagues and to practice presenting papers. It also provides a forum for fellow students to network and learn more about the work and projects of colleagues.
Schedule of speakers for the current academic year

The Graduate Student Lunch Series: Global Topics is co-sponsored by the Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs (GAIA Centers) and the Rutgers University Libraries. The program will take place at Alexander Library on College Avenue Campus and the networking portion of the program includes a brief overview of research tips provided by university librarians.

Space is limited! RSVP is required to attend. Please secure your spot at the link below by end of day Thursday, October 2. The research paper will be circulated to those who RSVP to attend on the Friday before the presentation. RSVP here.

October 7
Tuesday
4:30pm-6pm
191 College Avenue, 1st floor
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS

The Department of English, the Department of Women's and Gender Studies, and the Center for Race and Ethnicity present a commemoration entitled, "Remembering Maya Angelou: A Life in Words." Maya Angelou, who died May 28, 2014, was celebrated as a writer and civil rights activist, and continues to be one of the most renowned and influential voices of our time. Join Evie Shockley (English), Cheryl Wall (English), and Abena Busia (English/Chair, Women's and Gender Studies), three scholar-writers on the Rutgers faculty, as they speak on the life and legacy of this global renaissance woman.
October 8
Wednesday
7pm
Alexander Library
4th floor Teleconference Lecture Hall
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS
flyer

The Department of Africana Studies presents "The Global Anti-Apartheid Movement and the Transition to Democratic Rule in South Africa: Reflections After Twenty Years." The co-sonsors include: the College Avenue Campus Dean, the Graduate School of Education's South Africa Initiative, and the Paul Robeson Cultural Center. The keynote speakers include Rev. M. William Howard, Jr. (Pastor, Bethany Baptist Church and former Chair of the Rutgers Board of Governors) and Enuga Reddy (Former Assistant Secretary General and Director of the United Nations Center Against Apartheid). Commentary and reflections will be provided by Abena P. A. Busia (Chair, Women's and Gender Studies), Allen Howard (History, Emeritus), Walton Johnson (Africana Studies), Darren Clarke (GSE, SAI) and Maraina Montgomery (Counselor in Residence, Residence Life).

Please contact Edward Ramsamy (Chair, Africana Studies) at ramsamy@rci.rutgers.edu or at 848-445-3312 for information.
October 13
Monday
5:30pm-7:30pm
Douglass Student Center
Meeting Room E
DOUGLASS CAMPUS
flyer

The Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs' "Global Health" biennial series, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, CAS, the Department of Psychology, CAPS and the Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures present a talk by Melody Moezzi (award-winning author, speaker, attorney, and activist) entitled, "No Public Health without Mental Health: Minority Youth, Mental Illness, Criminalization, and Social Stigma."
October 15
Wednesday
11am
Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights
360 Martin Luther King Blvd.
703 Hill Hall
NEWARK CAMPUS

The Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights and the Divsion of Global Affairs, RU-Newark; the Department of Women's and Gender Studies; and CAS present a talk by Lee Ann Fujii (Political Science, University of Toronto, and Ford Fellow hosted by Women's and Gender Studies, Rutgers-NB) entitled, "Putting on a show: The logic of violent display in Bosnia, Rwanda, and the U.S." for the weekly CGHR colloquium, "Pathways to Perpetration: Local and Global Intersections."
October 15
Wednesday

6:30pm-7:30pm
Campbell Hall Room A1
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS

CAS, Journalism and Media Studies, and the Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs' "Global Health!" Biennial Theme present a talk by Kim Selden (Executive Director, Global Media Study Abroad Program) entitled, "Media, Public Health and Social Change in the Sahel."

The presentation will focus on the global affects of the digital divide and innovative solutions to bridging the gap with an emphasis on the health sector. Ms. Selden will discuss The Global Media Project, a cutting edge program that partners with local universities, programs and organizations in the US and Sahel to integrate media into their health programming. By working with health programs and professionals and incorporating media into their strategic methods and objectives participants engage in social change by empowering individuals with important knowledge and information. The presentation will introduce these methods in detail and the ways in which individuals and organizations can join the movement and create social change all over the world.

Special thanks to Todd Wolfson (Journalism and Media Studies) for hosting this presentation in his course "Media and Social Change" (04:567:380).
October 16
Thursday

2:15pm
Livingston Student Center Room 201 AB
LIVINGSTON CAMPUS
flyer

Cinema Studies; Latin American Studies; Critical Caribbean Studies; Spanish and Portuguese; CAS; and Classroom Enrichment present Cuban filmmaker Gloria Rolando. Rolando will present clips from her award-winning work and discuss what filmmaking in Cuba is like.
October 16
Thursday

2:30pm-4pm
John Cotton Dana Library, 4th Floor, Dana Room
RU-NEWARK

The Department of History, Newark College of Arts and Sciences and University College–Newark presents a talk by Fowsia Abdulkadir (Ph.D. Candidate, School of Canadian Studies, Carleton University, specializing in Political Economy and Women's and Gender Studies; and Policy Analyst, Public Health Agency, Canada) entitled, "Somalia Unraveled: The Development, Demise, and Destruction of the Somali State." For more information contact
Said Samatar (History, RU-Newark).
October 20
Monday
12:35pm-3:35pm
Hickman Hall Room 119
DOUGLASS CAMPUS

CAS, the Department of Women's and Gender Studies and the Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages present a talk by Ousseina Alidou (Center for African Studies Director and AMESALL Professor) entitled, "Contextualizing Boko Haram."

Special thanks to Abena P. A. Busia, Chair, Department of Women's and Gender Studies, for screening this talk in her Social Justice course 01:904:399:01.
October 21
Tuesday
4pm
Ruth Dill Johnson Crockett Building, 1st Floor Conference Room
162 Ryders Lane
DOUGLASS CAMPUS
flyer

The Institute for Women's Leadership's Dialogues with the IWL Director Series presents "A Conversation with Jane Bennett and IWL Director Alison Bernstein about Women & Leadership in South Africa."


The program will feature Professor Jane Bennett, Head of the African Gender Institute, editor of Feminist African Journal, scholar and activist, who is vastly knowledgeable of feminist theory, sexualities, pedagogies and violence. She is interested in research allied to political activism within the African continent. She works regularly with colleagues at several universities in North and South America as well as the Human Sciences Research Council and a number of NGOs across Southern and Eastern Africa.

Please RSVP to Emily Haran: emharan@rci.rutgers.edu.
October 23
Thursday
6pm-8pm
Edward J. Bloustein School Forum
Civic Square Building
33 Livingston Avenue
New Brunswick
flyer

CAS, the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, and the Department of History present a "Teach-in on the Political Economy of Ebola." CAS Associate Director and Chair, Department of French, Renée Larrier, will moderate the following panelists: Ismail Rashid (History, Vassar College), Allen Howard (Professor Emeritus of History), Meredeth Turshen (Public Health Policy, Bloustein School), and Tefera Gezmu (Public Health, Bloustein School). The teach-in will offer solutions to the Ebola crisis by exploring the following questions: What is Ebola? Why is Ebola killing many youth and women? How is Ebola a regional crisis? Have war and structural adjustment lead to Ebola? Why are women the main caregivers? Should the U.S. military be delivering aid? What role might outside agencies have?

Please note: this program is intended to complement, not replace, the
"Zoonosis and Society: Interdisciplinary Perspectives of Animal-to-Human Disease" Ebola forum on November 14.

NOVEMBER
November 3
Monday
12:35pm-3:35pm
Hickman Hall Room 119
DOUGLASS CAMPUS

CAS, the Department of Women's and Gender Studies, and the Department of Africana Studies present the Fall 2014 installment of the An African Movie and Dialogue Series: "Miners Shot Down" (a film by Rehad Desai, South Africa, 2014, 85 min). Edward Ramsamy, Chair, Department of Africana Studies, will present the film and moderate the post discussion.

Special thanks to Abena P. A. Busia, Chair, Department of Women's and Gender Studies, for screening this film in her Social Justice course 01:904:399:01.
November 6
Thursday
1pm-1:30pm reception
1:40pm-3pm public reading and book launch
Brower Commons ABC
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS
Press Release

CAS; Writers House; the Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures; Comparative Literature; the Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs; the SAS Dean of Humanities; the SAS Executive Vice Dean; the Department of Africana Studies; and Africa World Press, Inc. and The Red Sea Press, Inc. present a public reading and book launch of Hiding in Plain Sight (Penguin Books, October 2014) by Somali novelist, essayist, playwright, and screenwriter, Nuruddin Farah.

Copies of Hiding in Plain Sight will be on site and for sale.
November 11
Tuesday
1:40pm-3pm
Tillett Hall Room 224
LIVINGSTON CAMPUS

CAS and the Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures present a talk by Abdilatif Abdalla (Visiting Scholar, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) entitled, "Poetry and Society in the Swahili Experience."

Bio:
Abdilatif Abdalla is an organic intellectual, a distinguished poet and a dedicated political activist from Mombasa, Kenya. At the age of 22 he
became the first political prisoner of post-colonial Kenya on charges of
political activities against the Kenyan dictatorship. While in confinement, he wrote his celebrated and award-winning collection of Swahili poems, Sauti ya Dhiki (Voice of Agony). After his release from Kamiti Maximum Prison he was appointed Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Kiswahili Research, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. In 1979 he moved to England to work for the Kiswahili Service of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), and between 1986 and 1994 he served as the Managing Director and Editor-in-Chief of Africa Events, an international current affairs monthly magazine on Africa, published in London. After teaching Swahili language and literature briefly at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, he joined the Institute of African Studies at the University of Leipzig, Germany, where he taught Swahili Studies until his retirement in 2011. Abdalla has authored or edited over twelve books, including Wema Hawajazaliwa, the first Swahili translation of Ayi Kwei Armah’s, The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born.
Abdalla is currently a visiting scholar at the University of Michigan, Ann
Arbor.

Special thanks to CAS Director Ousseina Alidou for holding this talk in her "Introduction to the Literatures of Africa" course 01:013:211.
November 14
Friday
12pm-5pm
Tillett Hall Room 232
LIVINGSTON CAMPUS
flyer

The Rutgers working group "Zoonosis and Society: Interdisciplinary Perspectives of Animal-to-Human Disease" presents an Ebola Forum which will provide information on all of the dimensions of the outbreak. Sponsored by the Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs "Global Health!" series.
November 20-23
Thursday-Sunday
JW Marriott Indianapolis Hotel
Indianapolis, Indiana

The African Studies Association will hold its 57th Annual Meeting, "Rethinking Violence, Reconstruction and Reconciliation."
DECEMBER
December 2
Tuesday
5:30pm-7:10pm
Comparative Literature Office Building
195 College Avenue
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS
abstract and bio

CAS, Comparative Literature, the Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures, and the Department of Women's and Gender Studies proudly present a talk by Wendy Belcher (Department of Comparative Literature, Princeton University) entitled, "Same-Sex Intimacies in an Early Modern African Text about an Ethiopian Female Saint, Gädlä Wälättä P̣eṭros (1672)."


Web: A story about Prof. Belcher’s work on this text appeared in http://discovery.princeton.edu/2012/12/02/the-life-of-an-ethiopian-saint/

Special thanks to CAS Director Ousseina Alidou for holding this talk in her "Women Writers of Africa" course ( 01:013:401:01, 16:730:660:01, 16:195:504:01, 16:016:502:01).
SPRING 2015
JANUARY
Date
day
time
venue
CAMPUS
flyer
FEBRUARY
Date
day
time
venue
CAMPUS
flyer
MARCH
Women's History Month
March 27
Friday
8am-5pm (to be confirmed)
Alexander Library
4th Floor Teleconference Lecture Hall
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS

CAS and the Department of History present the 9th Greater New York Area Africa Historians Annual Workshop. For more information please contact graduate student organizers Moyagaye Bedward and Taylor Moore. Special thanks to our African Studies librarian Melissa Gasparotto and Alexander Library for their support of this workshop.
APRIL
Date
day
time
venue
CAMPUS
flyer



 


 

 

 

 

 


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