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UPCOMING HIGHLIGHTS
All Events Are Free and Open to the Public



2013/2014 EVENTS CALENDAR
| Archives | University Academic Calendar |
Last Updated April 8, 2014

[January | February | March | April | May ]

SPRING 2014
JANUARY
January 30
Thursday
Orbit II, Paul Robeson Student Center
NEWARK CAMPUS

Women in Media-Newark, in collaboration with RU-Newark's Office of University-Community Partnerships, invites you to attend a reception and art exhibit curated by Gladys Barker Grauer, for the 5th Annual Women's History Month Film Festival, "Salubrious Justice." The film festival, which features an international array of independent films by and about women, will take place March 5-8. The reception will feature work by artists Eleta Caldwell, Gladys Barker Grauer, Vivian McDuffie, Bisa Washington, Florence Weisz, and Adrienne Wheeler.
FEBRUARY
Student Life/ Office of Multicultural Student Involvement's
Black History Month Calendar

This talk has been rescheduled from February 13 to February 18, due to the storm.

February 18

Tuesday
1:40-3pm
Beck Hall Room 221
LIVINGSTON CAMPUS
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CAS and the Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures invite you to attend a lecture by Nigerian Fulbright Visiting Scholar Dr. Christine Ofulue entitled, “Negotiating Africanness: Language Practices and Contemporary Identities in Nigerian Pidgin and Gullah/Geechee Creole Contexts.”

Dr. Christine Ofulue is an Associate Professor of Linguistics at the National Open University of Nigeria and was a visiting lecturer at the University of Ibadan. Her research interests are in sociolinguistic approaches to the study of Pidgin and creole languages and the maintenance of minority languages. Her current research, a book- length project, investigates the sociolinguistic dynamics of the historical relationship that Nigerian Pidgin shares with two North American creole varieties, Gullah/Geechee and African American Vernacular English. Dr. Ofulue featured recently in the seminar series of the Institute of African American Research, and in collaboration with the Linguistics Program at the University of South Carolina http://artsandsciences.sc.edu/iaar/seminars.

The Outreach Lecturing Fund (OLF) allows Fulbright Visiting Scholars who are currently in the United States to travel to other higher education institutions across the country. Each year some 800 faculty and professionals from around the world receive Fulbright Scholar grants for advanced research and university lecturing. The purpose of the OLF is to allow these scholars to share their specific research interests, speak on the history and culture of their home country, exchange ideas with U.S. students, faculty and community organizations, become better acquainted with U.S. higher education, and create linkages between their home and host institutions and CIES.

Special thanks to Ousseina Alidou for holding this lecture in her African Foklore and Myth course (01:013:312).

MARCH
March 3
Monday
12pm-1:30pm
Graduate School of Education
10 Seminary Place
Lecture Hall - Room 124
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS
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You are cordially invited to attend the Graduate Student International/Global Lunch Series. As part of the series, graduate students from any discipline/campus meet to present papers that have a global or international focus. The Series is an opportunity for graduate students to share their work with colleagues and to practice presenting papers. It also provides a forum for fellow students to network and learn more about the work and projects of colleagues.

The next presentation and lunch takes place on Monday, March 3, 12:00 to 1:30 p.m. At this session Chika Okoye, Division of Global Affairs, Rutgers-Newark, will present Social Responses to Economic Adjustment: The Resurgence of the Nigerian Protest Movement. Networking and lunch begins at 12:00 pm followed by the presentation and discussion. The session will conclude at 1:30 pm.

A light lunch is provided. Space is limited! Please RSVP to info@gaiacenters.rutgers.edu to secure your seat by noon on Friday, February 28. The paper will be circulated to those who RSVP to attend.

March 4-8, 11, 18, and 25
The start time for each date is 5pm.

Venues:
Tuesday, March 4: Paul Robeson Student Center, Rutgers-Newark campus
Wednesday, March 5: East Orange Public Library, East Orange, NJ
Thursday, March 6-Saturday, March 8: Paul Robeson Student Center, RU-Newark
Friday, March 7, 5pm, award ceremony for Abena P.A. Busia
Tuesdays March 11, 18, and 25: East Orange Public Library

Full Press Release

Festival Schedule 2014

Women in Media-Newark, in collaboration with RU-Newark's Office of University-Community Partnerships, invites you to attend the 5th Annual Women's History Month Film Festival, "Salubrious Justice." The film festival features an international array of independent films by and about women. With the aim of presenting films that focus on the intersection of health and justice issues, the festival will open with a Women’s History Month Film Festival for Youth on March 4th at the Paul Robeson Student Center at the Rutgers-Newark campus, 350 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Newark NJ. On March 5th the East Orange Public Library will host a special screening of Patrice Johnson’s Hill and Gully, a film that examines the mental health concerns of an urban family. The festival will move back to The Paul Robeson Student Center at Rutgers University Newark for the screenings on March 6-8th,. The film screenings are free and open to the public and are offered in recognition of Women's History Month. A “Salubrious Justice” art exhibit curated by Gladys Barker Grauer that features the artwork by six local women artists will also be on display at the Paul Robeson Student Center during the course of the film festival. Visit www.wim-n.com for more information.

This year's festival is dedicated to international human rights lawyer Hauwa Ibrahim.

March 5
Wednesday
10am-11:30am master classes by Philadanco artists (guests welcome to observe!)
12:30pm-2pm lecture by Dr. Dixon Gottschild
2pm-3pm book signing and reception
Nicholas Music Center, Studio 110
DOUGLASS CAMPUS
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The Mason Gross Department of Dance and CAS, under the banner of Women's History Month, with a focus on African Studies, present a guest lecture by renowned dance scholar Dr. Brenda Dixon Gottschild. Dr. Dixon Gottschild is the author of several books including Digging the Africanist Presence in American Performance: Dance and Other Contexts, The Black Dancing Body: From Coon to Cool, Waltzing in the Dark: African American Vaudeville and Race Politics in the Swing Era, and her most recent book Joan Myers Brown & the Audacious Hope of the Black Ballerina: A Biohistory of American Performance.

Joan Myers Brown, the founder of Philadanco Dance Company, and the Dance Department have organized master dance classes taught by Philadanco artists for BFA Dance majors from 10am-11:30am. Please attend and observe the dancers!

March 5
Wednesday
7pm-9:30pm
Alexander Library
4th Floor Teleconference Lecture Hall
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS
Parking is available in lots 26, 30 & the College Avenue Parking Deck
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The Center for Middle Eastern Studies and the Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures present, in collaboration with Documentary Fortnight: MoMA's International Festival of Nonfiction Film and Media, a film screening of "The Uprising" followed by a q&a with Director Peter Snowdon. The film is produced by Rien à Voir in association with Third Films.

"The Uprising" shows us the Arab revolutions from the inside. It is a multi-camera, first-person account of that fragile, irreplaceable moment when life ceases to be a prison, and everything becomes possible again. This feature-length documentary is composed entirely of videos made by citizens and long-term residents of Tunisia, Egypt, Bahrain, Libya, Syria, and Yemen. The film uses this footage, not to recount the actual chronology of events or analyse their causes, but to create an imaginary pan-Arab uprising that exists (for the moment) only on the screen.

March 11
Tuesday
4:30pm-7pm
Center for Race and Ethnicity
191 College Avenue, 1st floor
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS
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The Center for Race and Ethnicity invites you to a film screening: "Nollywood Babylon" which explores the impact of a global film industry (that of Nigeria, the 3rd largest film industry in the world) on the U.S. media landscape. Following the film, a discussion will be moderated by Kaia Shivers, Ph.D. candidate, School of Communication and Information and CAS Graduate Affiliate. Pizza will be served. Please RSVP if you plan to attend, as space is limited.
Email Contact: raceethnicity@sas.rutgers.edu

March 24
Monday
4:30pm
Reception with Indian snacks will follow the talk
Alexander Library, Pane Room
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS

The South Asian Studies Program, CAS, and Geography present a talk by Sharad Chari (Center for Indian Studies in Africa, University of Witwatersrand, South Africa) entitled, "Apartheid Remains: Ruins of Segregation, Remnants of Struggle."

The Indian Ocean city of Durban is a palimpsest of many layers of segregation, apartheid and struggle. The differentiated remains of the past speak to different moments in a century of state-sanctioned racism and opposition. This paper emerges from research grounded in two neighborhoods in South Durban, in which the key question is how remains of the past persist as obstacles to change in the present. In this talk, I focus on the revolutionary outburst in 1970s and 1980s Durban that was key to apartheid's end. I trace the spatial dialectics of revolution through four moments: a communitarian or 'politico-theological' moment, an insurrectionist moment, an attempt to bring the two together in something like an urban revolution, and what I call the moment of the disqualified, exemplified in a spectacular sabotage cell and in the limits to revolutionary expertise from the perspective of people who still live in frustration in neighborhoods next to oil refineries today.

Bio: Dr. Sharad Chai is Associate Professor at the Centre for Indian Studies in Africa and Department of Anthropology at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. He previously taught at the University of Michigan and the London School of Economics. He is part of the Editorial Collective for Antipode: A Radical Journal of Geography, the Editor of the Antipode Book Series, and the author of Fraternal Capital: Peasant Workers, Self-Made Men, and Globalization in Provincial India (Stanford).

*Free parking is available in the Rutgers Parking Deck, adjacent to the library, and accessible from 622 George Street in New Brunswick.

March 27-29
Thursday-Saturday
Concordia University
Chicago, IL
Call for papers

Rutgers Professor Jim Simon (President, Liberian Studies Association) invites you to attend the 46th Annual Conference of the Liberian Studies Association. This year’s theme will reflect the needs and responsibilities of Liberia as a Member of the Global Community.
APRIL
April 8
Tuesday
4pm
Biological Sciences Building Room 206
DOUGLASS CAMPUS

CAS and Anthropology a Department of Anthropology 2014 Speaker Series lecture
by Saida Hodzic (Anthropology and Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Cornell University) entitled,"Calibrating Sovereignty: NGO's, Crime, and the Crisis of Law."
April 10
Thursday
4pm Reception
4:30pm Lecture
Institute for Research on Women
Ruth Dill Johnson Crockett Building
162 Ryders Lane
DOUGLASS CAMPUS

The Institute for Research on Women presents a Decolonizing Gender/Gendering Decolonization Distinguished Lecture Series lecture by Drucilla Cornell (Political Science, Women's Studies, Comparative Literature) entitled, "Can a Woman be a Chief?"
April 15
Tuesday
1:40pm-3pm
Beck Hall Room 221
LIVINGSTON CAMPUS
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CAS and the Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures present a talk by Jean Semler (Founder, Change A Life Uganda) entitled, "African Basketry Weaving and Storytelling in Uganda."Many thanks to CAS Director Ousseina Alidou for screening this film in her "African Folkore and Myth" course 01:013:312.
April 17
Thursday
1:40pm-3pm
Livingston Student Center, Room 201B
LIVINGSTON CAMPUS
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CAS, the African Studies Association, the Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures, and the Livingston Campus Dean present the 9th Annual African Studies Association Presidential Lecture at Rutgers by ASA President James Pritchett (Anthropology, Michigan State University) entitled, "The Lunda-Ndembu: Myth and the Making of Contemporary Consciousness in Northwestern Zambia."

Special thanks to CAS Director Ousseina Alidou for hosting this lecture in her AMESALL "African Folkore and Myth" course 01:013:312.
April 24
Thursday
1:40pm-3pm
Beck Hall Room 221
LIVINGSTON CAMPUS

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CAS and the Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures present a talk by Carol Sterling (Arts and Education Consultant and Educational Puppeteer) entitled, "Bringing Puppetry to Education Majors in Uganda as a U.S. Fulbright Specialist."

Special thanks to CAS Director Ousseina Alidou for hosting this lecture in her AMESALL
"African Folkore and Myth" course 01:013:312.

April 30
Wednesday
3pm-4:15pm Rutgers Student Center
5pm-6pm Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum
COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS

CAS and the Departments of French and Comparative Literature present readings by Clayton Eshleman (National Book Award winning poet and translator). In the first session of this double-reading Eshleman will read selections of his renowned translations of the poetry of Aimé Césaire, the great Martiniquan Surrealist, with readings of the French originals by François Cornilliat. In the second session, Eshleman will read selections of his own profoundly original poems from The Grindstone of Rapport and other works. This reading will be followed by a brief reception.

MAY
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time
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CAMPUS
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