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UPCOMING HIGHLIGHTS
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FALL 2015/ SPRING 2016
EVENTS CALENDAR

| Archives | University Academic Calendar |
Last Updated July 1, 2015





FALL 2015 [September | October | November | December]
SPRING 2016 [January | February | March | April ]
FALL 2015
SEPTEMBER
September 24-26
Thursday-Saturday
Ruth Dill Johnson Crockett Building, 1st floor conference room
162 Ryders Lane
DOUGLASS CAMPUS

The Department of Anthropology, CAS, the Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs, the Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures, the SAS Office of the Social and Behavioral Sciences Area Dean (and many more sponsors to be announced) present a workshop entitled, "Global Africa."
OCTOBER
October 22
Thursday
1:40pm-3pm
Livingston Student Center, Coffee House Room
LIVINGSTON CAMPUS

CAS and the Department of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures present a lecture by Abdalla Uba Adamu (Mass Communications, Bayero University) entitled, "Transglobal Media Flows and African Popular Culture: Revolution and Reaction in Muslim Hausa Popular Culture."

This essay explores the impact of global trends and flows of popular culture to Muslim Hausaland from 1935 to 2005 in three distinct areas: prose fiction, oral performing arts and video film. The paper specifically analyses the impact of popular culture from the Far East and Asia on the transformation of the identity of creative and performing arts among the Hausa of northern Nigeria. The main work that led the way to such literary influence was Magana Jari Ce, often considered the unalloyed Hausa literary classic. This book, published in 1937, gave birth to a phenomenon of artistic adaptation - or more directly, appropriation - of creative works by the Hausa from countries and cultures deemed to share the same cultural space as the Hausa. Magana Jari Ce, based on extensive re-telling and re-structuring of folk tales from various European, Middle Eastern and Far Eastern cultures laid the foundation of using the cultural identity of other societies in Hausa popular culture. When globalization became electronic in the form of Hindi cinema, Hausa performance artistes followed the lead of literary adapters of the Othersʹ literature, and this led to the emergence of oral poets - both in the popular culture and religious domains - who use Hindi film song motifs as a template for their art. This process culminated into the appearance of the Hausa video film from 1990 which is almost exclusively based on the Hindi film concept of storyline and uses the essential features of Hindi film - which was the love triangle, forced marriage and long song and dance routines that focus mainly on the sexuality of the female mime singers. This revolution in mass popular culture was counteracted by a reaction from the Islamic environment in which the "modernizing" Hausa popular culture finds itself.

Special thanks to Ousseina Alidou (AMESALL) for holding this lecture in her Introduction to the Literatures of Africa" course 01:013:211.
NOVEMBER
November 19-22
Thursday-Sunday
Sheraton San Diego Hotel and Marina
San Diego, CA

The African Studies Association presents the 58th Annual Meeting of the ASA, "The State and Study of Africa."

 

DECEMBER
date
day
time
venue
CAMPUS
SPRING 2016
JANUARY
date
day
time
venue
CAMPUS
FEBRUARY
Black History Month
date
day
time
venue
CAMPUS
MARCH
Women's History Month
date
day
time
venue
CAMPUS
APRIL
date
day
time
venue
CAMPUS



 


 

 

 

 

 


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